Tag Archives: privacy

How To Stop Windows 10 Collecting More Of Your Data Than It Needs To

If you are someone who uses Windows 10, you may or may not know Windows 10 is sending a whole lot of data about your computer back to base including potentially your personal files.

In Windows 10, under ‘Diagnostic and usage data’, is a setting for how much of your data gets sent back to Microsoft. To get an idea of just how much data Microsoft is grabbing, it is only on the lowest setting called “Security” that “No user content, such as user files or communications, is gathered“.

If you are a Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Professional user (you can find out what versions of Windows 10 you have by searching for ‘System Information’) you will not even get the option of setting the data grab to Security: for Home/Pro users the lowest setting you can go down to is Basic. What a lot of people don’t realise is Home/Pro both default to Full, the highest possible setting for hoovering up your data.

For Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Professional users, here are the steps to change your system privacy settings down to Basic:

1. Click in the search bar at the bottom left of your screen and type in “Feedback”
2. Click ‘Feedback settings’ under Best match
3. When the ‘Feedback’ window appears, you should see a section called ‘Diagnostic and usage data’ which has a drop-down menu. Change this to ‘Basic’.
4. Nice job! You have now changed your system privacy settings. The drop-down should now look like this:

Capture

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An interesting answer to an interesting question

Q: “It used to be that I could limit what strangers saw about me to almost nothing. I could not show my profile picture, not allow them to “poke” or message me, certainly not allow them to view my profile page. Now, even my interests have to be public information. Why can’t I control my own information anymore?”

Answer from Elliot Schrage, vice president for public policy at Facebook: “Joining Facebook is a conscious choice by vast numbers of people who have stepped forward deliberately and intentionally to connect and share. We study user activity. We’ve found that a few fields of information need to be shared to facilitate the kind of experience people come to Facebook to have. That’s why we require the following fields to be public: name, profile photo (if people choose to have one), gender, connections (again, if people choose to make them), and user ID number. Facebook provides a less satisfying experience for people who choose not to post a photo or make connections with friends or interests. But, other than name and gender, nothing requires them to complete these fields or share information they do not want to share. If you’re not comfortable sharing, don’t.”

Link: Facebook Executive Answers Reader Questions [nytimes.com]